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MA courses

1)- MA in Applied Linguistics (Non-Thesis Track)

                                                                     Number of required units is (42), including the research project, as follows:

Type of Courses

No. of Courses

No. of Units Required

Core Courses

13

39

Elective Courses (if any)

N/A

N/A

Research Project

1

3

Total

14

42 Units

 

 

Program Study Plan

                                                        First Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

1

Eng 500

Structure of English

3 (3 + 0)

2

Eng 508

Semantics

3 (3 + 0)

3

Eng 501

Trends in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

4

Eng 528

Teaching Materials : Design & Evaluation

3 (3 + 0)

Total

12 Study Units

                                                       Second Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

1

Eng 502

Language Assessment

3 (3 + 0)

2

Eng 520

Technology and Language Teaching

3 (3 + 0)

3

Eng 524

Language Acquisition

3 (3 + 0)

4

Eng 503

Research in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

Total

12 Study Units

 

                                                       Third Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

1

Eng 504

Discourse Analysis

3 (3 + 0)

2

Eng 505

Language Policy & Planning

3 (3 + 0)

3

Eng 506

Lexicography

3 (3 + 0)

4

Eng 597

Seminar in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

Total

12 Units

 

                                                       Fourth Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

1

Eng 532

Learner Language

3 (3 + 0)

2

Eng 533

Research Project

3 (3 + 0)

Total

6 Units

The General Total

42 Units

 

Description of Courses

 

                                                       First Level:

Eng 500

Structure of English

3 (3 + 0)

The first part of this course provides a general introduction to English phonetics and phonology. The second part of this course provides introduction to the fundamentals of morphological and syntactic analysis, the structure of English morphology and English syntax (word formation, sentence, clause and phrase types and structures).

 

Eng 508

Semantics

3 (3 + 0)

This course provides a general introduction to the issues of meaning and logical interpretation in natural language. It deals with both lexical and sentential aspects. It concentrates on the issue of reference in natural language, and it presents some analytical approaches to it.

 

Eng 501

Trends in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

This course explores applied linguistics in a broad sense. It introduces students to different interdisciplinary areas of applied linguistics, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and educational linguistics. Educational linguistics, however, is given a special attention, and students will be introduced to various approaches and methods of foreign language teaching in use today.

 

Eng 528

Teaching Materials : Design & Evaluation

3 (3 + 0)

The first part of this course aims at introducing students to the principles and practices involved in the preparation of language teaching materials: design, selection, gradation, presentation and evaluation. The second part will be focusing on how to apply what has been taught in the first part in evaluating different types of language teaching materials.

 

                                                       Second Level:

Eng 502

Language Assessment

3 (3 + 0)

This course takes a look at types of language tests, such as achievement, proficiency and aptitude tests. It also covers the main theoretical and practical characteristics of a good test, such as reliability, validity, discrimination and practicality. Students will be involved in designing tests of language skills and sub-skills. Alternative assessments will also be discussed; so will be the use of computers in language assessment.

 

Eng 520

Technology & Language Teaching

3 (3 + 0)

This course introduces students to the new media technological aids used in language teaching and learning, including computers, interactive smart boards, the internet, smartphone apps, and different educational software programs. Methods of using these aids will be taught, and their potentials and limitations will be discussed.

 

Eng 524

Language Acquisition

3 (3 + 0)

This course surveys the major theories and research in first and second-language acquisition and their applications in language teaching and learning. Behaviorist, cognitive and innate language capacity theories and their proponents will be introduced and compared. The role of language universals, language aptitude, learning strategies, and other factors will be discussed.

 

Eng 503

Research in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

This course gives students the necessary knowledge and skills for conducting research in applied linguistics. It examines epistemological paradigm, various research designs (experimental, quasi-experimental, qualitative, quantitative designs), research instruments, types of data, and sampling techniques. The course also explores the use of computer software in research and in analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data.

 

                                                       Third Level:

Eng 504

Discourse Analysis

3 (3 + 0)

This course introduces students to the fast growing research in the field of Discourse Analysis. Terms like discourse, language metafunctions, text, register, genre, and speech acts will be presented. The course includes pragmatics and speech act theory, lexico-grammar, text linguistics, and ethnomethodology. Methods of analyzing spoken and written discourse will be explored.

 

Eng 505

Language Policy & Planning

3 (3 + 0)

Students are introduced to the concepts and functions of language policy and planning. Issues like multilingualism, diglossia and polyglossia and other circumstances requiring policy and planning. Language planning as an instrument of language policy is discussed in terms of types of planning and phases. Issues related to the why, who and how planning is carried out will also be dealt with. 

 

Eng 506

Lexicography

3 (3 + 0)

The course familiarizes students with different types of mono and bilingual dictionaries (conventional and digitized). Monolingual dictionaries will be considered in terms of types and content: lexical based, semantic based and thematic based dictionaries and subtypes of each. Bilingual dictionaries will be primarily considered in terms of content and purpose: comprehension, production and translation. The students will be trained to use computer programs such as concordancers and database management software in dictionary making.

 

Eng 597

Seminar in Applied Linguistics

3 (3 + 0)

In the seminar various topics in applied linguistics are chosen by the class and /or assigned by the professor, researched by the students and discussed in class. 90% of the marks will be given for the research, presentation and discussion and 10% will be allotted for the final examination, which deals with the topics covered during the semester.

 

                                                       Fourth Level:

Eng 532

Learner Language

3 (3 + 0)

The course introduces students to the two categories of research related to the language of a learner: error analysis and its procedures and techniques, and interactional and conversation analysis. This includes procedures for data collection, error recognition, classification, explanation and evaluation, both for theoretical and pedagogical purposes.

 

Eng 533

Research Project

3 (3 + 0)

In this course the students will be required to write a high quality 6000 to 8000- word research projects. Students’ projects have to be related to the field of applied linguistics and to what they have been studying in the previous courses. Each student will be assigned to a supervisor who will guide him/her throughout the process.

 

                                                       For more information regarding the program, please contact Dr Khalid Aalghamdi, the

                                                       chair of the Graduate Studies in Applied Linguistics kalghamdi@ksu.edu.sa

 

2)- MA in English Litertaure (Non-Thesis Track)

Program Study Plan

 

                                               First Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG 531

Research Methods in Literary Studies

3 (3 + 0)

 

2

ENG 539

Theories of Literary Criticism

3 (3 + 0)

 

3

ENG 549

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

3 (3 + 0)

 

Total

9 Study Units

 

 

                                               Second Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG 560

American Literature to 1865

3 (3 + 0)

 

2

ENG 569

Studies in World Literature

3 (3 + 0)

 

3

ENG 592

18th Century and Romantic Literature

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 549

Total

9 Study Units

 

 

                                               Third Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG 562

American Literature after 1865

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 560

2

ENG 581

Comparative Literature

3 (3 + 0)

 

3

ENG 593

Victorian and Modern Literature

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 592

Total

9 Study Units

 

 

                                                Fourth Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG …

Elective (1)

3 (3 + 0)

 

2

ENG …

Elective (2)

3 (3 + 0)

 

3

ENG …

Elective (3)

3 (3 + 0)

 

Total

9 Study Units

 

 

                                                Fifth Level:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG 599

Research Project

3 (3 + 0)

 

Total

3 Study Units

 

The General Total

(39) Units

 

 

 

     Electives

 

                                            A student must choose any three courses from the following:

#

Course Code

Name

No. of Study Units

Prerequisite

1

ENG 507

Composition and Rhetoric

3 (3 +  0)

 

2

ENG 534

Topics in Literature

3 (3 +  0)

 

3

ENG 542

History of Western Thought

3 (3 + 0)

 

4

ENG 543

Cultural Studies

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 539

5

ENG 544

Postcolonial Theory and Criticism

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 539

6

ENG 548

Classical Heritage

3 (3 + 0)

 

7

ENG 550

Modern and Contemporary British Poetry

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 593

8

ENG 551

Modern and Contemporary British Drama

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 593

9

ENG 552

Modern and Contemporary British Novel

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 593

10

ENG 554

American Multicultural Fiction

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 560

11

ENG 557

American Autobiography

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 560

12

ENG 558

Arab American Literature

3 (3 + 0)

ENG 560

13

ENG 559

Women and Literature

3 (3 + 0)

 

 

 

Description of Courses

 

                                     Core Courses:

ENG 531

Research Methods in Literary Studies

3 (3 + 0)

The course instructs students in research methods both theoretically and practically. It explains the value of research and involves students in a lengthy research process that introduces online and library resources and teaches students how to distinguish and use reliable ones to enrich their topic and produce quality papers. The course also trains students to acknowledge sources and document them in an internationally recognized formatting.

 

ENG 539

Theories of Literary Criticism

3 (3 + 0)

The course introduces students to theories of literary criticism beginning with the 1930’s until the contemporary times. Making Formalism and New Criticism its starting point, it throws a retrospective light on the traditional approaches of the past to literature. It then moves onward through Structuralism, Marxist, Psychological, Mythological and Archetypal criticism to reach out to Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, Cultural Studies, and finally post-colonialism.

 

ENG 549

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

3 (3 + 0)

This course invites students to explore the highly rich and exquisite periods in the history and development of English literature: the medieval and the Renaissance. It examines the impact of Medieval literature on the formation of Renaissance culture that produced prominent authors and thinkers. It does so through the study of major works of poetry, prose, and drama from both ages and by prominent authors and will pay special attention to their social, religious, and political contexts through the selected works.

 

ENG 560

American Literature to 1865

3 (3 + 0)

The course deals with literature written in the United States from its earliest colonial days to its Civil War and explores the philosophical and religious orientations that shaped the American culture and the shift from ‘public self’ to “individualism” in the 20’s of the 19th century. It also theorizes about the rise of nationalism and its effect on the US contemporary political hegemony. Old and new literary forms and types also come into focus in the course.

 

ENG 562

American Literature after 1865

3 (3 + 0)

This course examines the origin and development of America’s literary tradition from the end of the Civil War to the present. A range of literary texts of different genres will be studied to familiarize the student with the major trends and movements (Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, post-Modernism) and representative writers (including women and minorities). The cultural, historical, social, religious, and political forces that have shaped the literature of this period will also be explored.

 

ENG 569

Studies in World Literature

3 (3 + 0)

The course introduces students to a wide variety of representative works of world literature (Western and non-Western) and focuses on understanding the integration of literature and culture. It stresses the cross-cultural contacts and exchanges of literary movements, theories, themes, styles, and genres and the significance of critical thinking and writing, all in a selection of culturally diverse literary works.

 

ENG 581

Comparative Literature

3 (3 + 0)

This course introduces students to the theories and practices of comparative literature. Students will be reading different theoretical and literary texts from various literatures including texts written by Arab writers. Eventually, students should be able to produce a comparative research that allows them to bridge the gap between Arabic and Western cultures.

 

ENG 592

18th Century and Romantic Literature

3 (3 + 0)

The first part of this survey course focuses on the neoclassical age (1660-1785). It traces social, political and religious evolution inside the era and the corresponding changes in taste and literary orientation. It covers major literary types like prose, poetry and the comedy of manners. The second part of the course will focus on the Romantic movement (1785-1830) and the outstanding changes in literary theory and practice as reflected in the poetry and prose works of the age and that led to the success of Romanticism. It will highlight its features that persisted up to the modern times despite the Victorian reactionary attitude to the tradition.

 

ENG 593

Victorian and Modern Literature

3 (3 + 0)

The survey of Victorian literature will take into consideration the social, economic, religious, and intellectual issues affecting the literary output of the age. It will explore the poetic forms engaged like the “Dramatic Monologue”. The literary shift to Pre-Raphaelitism towards the end of era will be indicated. The course will also acquaint students, in its second half, with the modern period and its experimentations in subject matter, form and style. The philosophical thought of post-WW1 and its anti-traditionalism will be explored. New themes and artistic strategies of the late 20thcentury poetry will also be emphasized. 

 

ENG 599

Research Project

3 (3 + 0)

The course instructs and trains students on how to draw on their knowledge of literature and critical theories to produce a quality research paper of publishable level. The strategy is to engage students in discussions of their areas of interest to help them select and define their topics; advise them on the most suitable critical methodology; direct them in writing, citing resources, and documenting their research projects.

 

 

                                    Elective Courses:

ENG 507

Composition and Rhetoric  

3 (3 + 0)

This course investigates a range of theoretical issues and concepts related to composition and rhetoric in the Western tradition. The selected topics will be situated in their specific historical, intellectual and cultural contexts, which span several periods of Western history starting with the classical rhetorical tradition up until modern and contemporary rhetorical/ composition theory. A special effort will be made to examine the relation between rhetorical and critical theory, and its implications for understanding and constructing literary texts.

 

ENG 534

Topics in Literature

3 (3+0)

The course teaches various topics in literatures that explore literary issues. Students may survey literary topics such as Literature and Popular Culture, Creative Writing, Children’s Literature, Regional Literature, and African American Literature. Alternatively, students may study a selected literary topic that deals with certain writers, literary movements, periods, theories, or literary genres.

 

ENG 542

History of Western Thought

3 (3 + 0)

This course spans the rise of Western thought, from its Eastern roots, through to contemporary Post-modern formulations that take on a multicultural perspective. The course will follow a chronological trajectory that will familiarize students with formative trends that have shaped Western culture to this day. Continuous focus will be maintained on the intersection of Western thought with literary theory and criticism, as a means of familiarizing students with the interdisciplinary import of this course.

 

ENG  543

Cultural Studies

3 (3 + 0)

The course reviews various conceptualisations of the notion of culture by examining how the concept has been theorised and studied. It traces the study of culture throughout many periods beginning with Enlightenments, post-Enlightenment. It engages Ethnographic, Marxist, neo-Marxist, structuralist, post-structuralist, post-modernist and post-colonialist theoretical repertoires. These theories are contextualised within critical study and analyses of literary texts through representative selections.

 

ENG 544

Postcolonial Theory and Criticism

3 (3 + 0)

This course will cover the historical rise and development of postcolonial theory and criticism within a chronological timeframe. Students will be introduced to contemporary debates about decolonization, globalization and the continued viability of the field of postcolonial studies. They will be familiarized with various theoretical aspects and terminology of the theory. The course will also emphasize the contribution of postcolonialism to the field of literary studies.

 

ENG 548

Classical Heritage

3 (3 + 0)

This course explores the richness and diversity of the literature of the Greco-Roman world, viewing it in both literary and cultural contexts.  Students will be introduced to a variety of Greek and Roman writers and thinkers, whose works (like dramatic traditions and epic poetry) and cultural, and philosophical thinking have historically stood as the main spring from which the whole Western thought, literature, art, and philosophy have drawn.   

 

ENG 550

Modern and Contemporary British Poetry

3 (3 + 0)

The course is divided into two sections: Modern and Contemporary British poetry. The first section traces the development of modern themes and styles in the work of selected major and minor poets beginning with the late nineteenth century till the middle of the twentieth century. The second section presents a living history of contemporary British poetry, from the 1940s to the present day and will focus on the intellectual and social contexts of the work of many contemporary poets, along with the poetic forms they employ. 

 

ENG 551

Modern and Contemporary British Drama

3 (3 + 0)

The course offers a selection of modern and contemporary plays and focuses on the sociopolitical changes that have influenced the formation of drama and informed the themes and techniques of the British theatre. The course also promotes the theoretical background that have shaped modern and contemporary drama, such as Realism, Naturalism, Expressionism, Symbolism, the Epic and the Absurd theatres and the interconnectedness of British dramatic texts with these theoretical contexts.

 

ENG 552

Modern and Contemporary British Novel

3 (3 + 0)

The course explores both the modern and contemporary British novel and highlights the move from high Modernism to multiculturalism and Post-colonialism. The hegemonic and imperialist tendencies of the first are challenged on the literary, political and cultural levels by the second. The contemporary novel calls for identity formation and nationalism and employs Gothicism, magic realism and cultural primitivism to achieve its objectives.

 

ENG 554

American Multicultural Fiction

3 (3 + 0)

This course is a study of American fiction from a multicultural perspective. It addresses cultural diversity through the reading and discussion of fiction by African-American, Native-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American fiction writers. Stereotypes, prejudices, misconceptions are exposed and the beliefs of these groups will be explored.

     
 

ENG 557

American Autobiography

3 (3 + 0)

This course surveys a variety of autobiographical texts written over several centuries of the American experience. The reading will cover both mainstream writers as well as minority/ethnic writers. The course will also examine a range of critical concepts and issues related to American self-representation including memory, voice, race, ethnicity, gender, and intercultural identity.

 

ENG 558

Arab American Literature

3 (3 + 0)

The course investigates the American literature written by Arab immigrants starting with the 19th century to the present day. It highlights the role of the American Civil Rights movement in enhancing the past cultural heritage of the Arab immigrants. The course also sheds light on a host of topics like “race”, “identity”, “gender”, “home”, “exile” and the tension between East and West that molded the identity of the Arab immigrant.

 

ENG 559

Women and Literature

3 (3 + 0)

This course examines the representation of the ethnic, raced, gendered female self in a number of genres from different periods. It focuses on many central feminist issues like gender, identity, race, politics, and power. It relies on many theories in addition to feminism to examine how women (authors and characters) from diverse cultures embrace socially and culturally constructed models to reclaim individual and communal identities.

 

                                                       For more information regarding the program, please contact Dr Ibrahim Aziz, the chair of

                                                       the Graduate Studies in English Literature englishlit@ksu.edu.sa

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